Researchers use 3D printers to weave wearable electronics into clothes

A few days ago, Chinese researchers have developed a new technology that binds electronic materials to clothing textiles through 3D printers, enabling them to obtain biomechanical energy from human motion.
3d printing
They used two "inks" to print the first E-textiles in 3D: one is a carbon nanotube solution used as a conductive core, and the second is made of silk for insulating conductive fibers. Two injection syringes filled with ink are attached to the coaxial nozzle, which is attached to the 3D printer. These syringes are used to draw custom designed patterns that are further used as triboelectric nanogenerator fabrics.
3d printing
This approach is more effective than other attempts to sew electronic components into fabrics. 3D printing technology allows researchers to easily embed multiple functions into fabrics. At the same time, the method is also cheaper and easier to expand because the nozzles are compatible with existing 3D printers and can exchange parts. There are of course disadvantages, that is, the resolution is limited to the mechanical motion accuracy of the 3D printer and the size of the nozzle.
3d printing
In the future, the research team will try to develop more types of 3D printer nozzles that can create designs with rich composition and structural diversity, and even integrate multiple coaxial nozzles to further create a highly flexible, wearable mix. Material electronics, while developing smart wearable systems with integrated features.
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